TV SERIES: SHERLOCK HOLMES

“Dear God, what is it like in your funny little brains? It must be so boring!”

“That’s the fatality of genius John, it needs an audience.”

“Look at you lot. You’re all so vacant. Is it nice not being me? It must be so relaxing.”

“Anderson, don’t talk out loud. You lower the IQ of the whole street.”

“Ordinary people fill their minds with all kinds of rubbish. That makes it hard to get at stuff that matters.”

-SHERLOCK HOLMES

Advertisements

MOVIE: THREE IDIOTS

Viru S: Remember, life is a race. If you don’t run fast, you’ll get trampled. Let me tell you a very interesting story.. This is an astronaut pen. Fountain pens and ballpoint pens don’t work in outer space. So scientists spent millions to invent this pen. It can write at any angle, in any temperature, in zero gravity. One day, when I was a student the Director of our institute called me. He said, “Viru Sahastrabuddhe”. I said, “Yes, Sir”. “Come here”. I got scared. He showed me this pen. He said, “This is a symbol of excellence”. “I give it to you”. “When you come across an extraordinary student like yourself pass it on to him”. For 32 years, I’ve been waiting for that student. But no luck. Anyone here who’ll strive to win this pen? Good. Put your hands down. Shall I post it on the notice board?
Rancho: One question, Sir. Sir, if pens didn’t work in outer space why didn’t the astronauts use a pencil? They’d have saved millions.
Viru S: I will get back to you on this.

“Today, my respect for that idiot shot up. Most of us went to college just for a degree. No degree meant no plum job, no pretty wife, no credit card, no social status. But none of this mattered to him, he was in college for the joy of learning. He never cared if he was first or last.”
Farhan Qureshi

“Life is a race, Run fast or you’ll get trampled. Even to be born, one had to race 300 million sperms.”
-Viru S

Viru S: What is this?
Chatur: A koel bird’s nest, sir.
Viru S: Wrong. A koel bird never makes her own nest. She lays her eggs in other nests and when they hatch, what do they do? They throw the other eggs out of the nest, and competition over. Their life begins with murder, that’s nature. You are also like the koel birds.”
-Viru S

“Pursue excellence, and success will follow, pants down.”
-Rancho

Rancho: That day I understood that this heart scares easily. You have to trick it, however big the problem is. Tell your heart, ‘Pal, all is well. All is well.’
Raju: Does that solve the problem?
Rancho: No, but you gain courage to face it.

Machine Class Professor: What is a machine? Why are you smiling?
Rancho: Sir, to study engineering was a childhood dream. I’m so happy to be here finally.
Machine Class Professor: No need to be so happy.Define a machine.
Rancho: A machine is anything that reduces human effort.
Machine Class Professor: Will you please elaborate?
Rancho: Sir, anything that simplifies work or saves time, is a machine. It’s a warm day, press a button, get a blast of air. The fan. A machine! Speak to a friend miles away. The telephone. A machine! Compute millions in seconds. The calculator. A machine! Sir, we’re surrounded by machines. From a pen’s nib to a pants’ zip- all machines. Up and down in a second. Up, down, up, down…
Machine Class Professor: What is the definition?
Rancho: I just gave it to you, Sir.
Machine Class Professor: You’ll write this in the exam? This is a machine- up, down, up, down… Idiot! Anybody else?
Chatur Ramalingam aka ‘Silencer’: Sir, machines are any combination of bodies so connected that their relative motions are constrained. And by which means force and motion maybe transmitted and modified as the screw in its nut or a lever range turnabout a fulcrum or a pulley by its pivot etc. esp a construction more or less complex consisting of a combination of moving parts or simple mechanical elements as wheels, levers, cams etc.
Machine Class Professor: Wonderful! Perfect. Please sit down. Chatur Ramalingam aka ‘Silencer’: Thank you.
Rancho: But Sir, I said the same thing in simple language.
Machine Class Professor: If you prefer simple language, join an Arts and Commerce College.
Rancho: But Sir, one must get the meaning too. What’s the point of blindly cramming a bookish definition.
Machine Class Professor: You think you’re smarter than the book? Write the textbook definition, mister, if you want to pass.
Rancho: But there are other books…
Machine Class Professor: Get out!
Rancho: Ooh.. Why?
Machine Class Professor: In simple language- Out! Idiot! Machine Class Professor: So, we’re discussing about the machine…
Machine Class Professor: Why are you back?
Rancho: Sir, I forgot to take something…
Machine Class Professor: What?
Rancho: Instruments that record, analyse, summarize, organize, debate and explain information; which are illustrative, non-illustrative, hardbound, paperback, jacketed, non-jacketed, with foreword, introduction, table of contents, index that are intended for the enlightenment, understanding, enrichment, enhancement, and education of the human brain through sensory route of vision… sometimes touch.
Machine Class Professor: [confused] What do you mean?
Rancho: Books, Sir. I forgot to take my books. May I?
Machine Class Professor: Couldn’t you ask simply?
Rancho: I tried simply, Sir. It simply didn’t work.

With such fear of tomorrow, how will you live today?
–Ranchoddas Chanchad

For once, dump your fear, or on your deathbed, you’ll regret it. With a little courage, you could’ve turned your life around.
–Rancho

“Make your passion your profession, then work will become play.”
–Rancho/ Farjan

“How you feel, matters to me. Mr. Kapoor makes no difference. I don’t even know his first name.”
–Farjan

“I’ve always listened to you. For once, let me listen to my heart.”
–Farjan

“It took me two broken legs to get me up on my feet. Wasn’t easy to get to this attitude. You keep your job, i’ll keep my attitude.”
–Raju

“Everything is fair in love and war, and this is World War III!”
–Viru S

“When I asked this question, were you excited? Curious? Thrilled that you’d learn something new? No. You all got into a frantic
race. What’s the use of such methods even if you come first? Will your knowledge increase? No, just the pressure. This is
college, not a pressure cooker.”
-Rancho

“Even a circus lion learns to sit in front of the whip, but you call such a lion well-trained, not well-educated.”
–Rancho

“We learned a lesson in human behavior. When you friend fails, you feel bad. When your friend tops, you feel worse.”
–Farjan

“Why publicize someone’s flaws? If your iron count is low, will the doctor prescribe tonic, or air your report on TV?”
–Rancho

Rancho: For school, you don’t need tuition money, just a uniform. Pick a school, buy the uniform, slip into class. In that sea of kids, no one will notice.
MM: And if I get caught?
Rancho: Then new uniform, new school

“When thrown out of one class, he’d slip into another. He said, “First year or fourth year, it’s knowledge. Grab it.”
-Farhan

Words of Wisdom from Reader’s Digest

Reader’s Digest is my favorite magazine of all times. It never fails to touch my heart or make me rethink some of my values and opinions. It definitely feeds my soul. If you’re not a fan of it yet, try getting a one year subscription. It does wonders. =) Below are some of my favorite excerpts from different articles of Reader’s Digest.

“Don’t get me wrong, Science & Literature are important. There will always be a place in the world for quantum physicists & Shakespearean scholars. But our schools cannot be designed to enable the best and the brightest to excel. They must also equip the weakest among us to survive. I can’t think of a more noble purpose for our schools than for them to spend every moment they have telling this to our kids: This is life, this is what you are going to face, and this is how you deal with it. Everything else is superfluity.”
-Adrian Tan, Reader’s Digest

“Today, we’re swamped by fact and opinion. There’s always a temptation to accept something we are told, especially if it’s well-crafted, especially if it’s something we agree with. But that’s not what educated people do. Educated people are rational and reasonable. They look at FACTS and apply LOGIC. If our schools teach nothing else, they should atleast teach critical thinking.”
-Adrian Tan, Reader’s Digest

“Is there any serious fiction-writing going on in Asia?”, I replied that more creative fiction was written everyday in Asia than any other region in the world. “Only we call it ‘news’ and print it in newspapers”, I said.
-Nury Vittachi, Reader’s Digest July 2011

“Indeed, if we can allow our children to be themselves without prejudice, they’ll build friendships that matter, with people, regardless of race or religion, who will be by their side through thick and thin. On such friendships are societies built and then we can truly be, as William Shakespeare once wrote, ‘We happy few, we band of brothers.’
-S. Varatharaja, Without Prejudice, Reader’s Digest, December 2011

“The problem with experience is that it usually teaches you something you really didn’t want to know.”
-Mountain Ear

“I have had time to reflect on this and believe that if I witness a crime, be it against humanity or nature, I am compelled to take action. If I simply redirect my attention and pretend nothing is happening, I become an accessory to the crime through my own inaction. Each time I do nothing, I lose a little bit of my soul and over time, I become dis-empowered and disenfranchised.”
-Mike Fincken

“Someone once said: “Friendship – pure, unselfish friendship, all through life’s allotted span, nurtures, strengthens, widens, lengthens, man’s relationship with man. Indeed, if we allow our children to be themselves without prejudice, they’ll build friendships that matter, with people, regardless of race or religion, who will be by their side through thick and thin. On such friendships are societies built and then we can truly be, as William Shakespeare once wrote, “We happy few, we band of brothers.”
-Mike Fincken

Movie Quotes: The Next Three Days

“Could it be about how rational thought destroys your soul? Could it be about the triumph of irrationality and the power that’s in there? Now, we spend a lot of time trying to organize the world; we build clocks and calendars and we try to predict the weather. But what part of our life is truly under our control? What if we choose to exist purely in a reality of our own making? Does that render us insane? And if it does, isn’t that better than a world of despair?”
-John

“Escaping is easy; the hardest part is staying free.”

Life Lesson: On Accepting Things “For The Sake Of”

image from http://www.google.com

an excerpt from Paulo Coelho’s story on THE IMPORTANCE OF THE CAT IN MEDITATION in the book Like A Flowing River

Having written a book about madness (Veronika decides to die) , I was forced to wonder how many things we do are imposed on us by necessity, or by the absurd. Why wear a tie? Why do clocks run “clockwise”? If we live in a decimal system, why does the day have 24 hours of 60 minutes?

The fact is, many of the rules we obey nowadays have no real foundation. Nevertheless, if we wish to act differently, we are considered “crazy” or “immature”. Meanwhile, society continues to create some systems which, in the fullness of time, lose their reason for existence, but continue to impose their rules. An interesting Japanese story illustrates what I mean by this:

A great Zen Buddhist master, who was in charge of the Mayu Kagi monastery, had a cat which was his true passion in life. So, during meditation classes, he kept the cat by his side – in order to make the most of his company.

One morning, the master – who was already quite old – passed away. His best disciple took his place.
– What shall we do with the cat? – asked the other monks.
As a tribute to the memory of their old instructor, the new master decided to allow the cat to continue attending the Zen Buddhist classes.

Some disciples from the neighboring monasteries, traveling through those parts, discovered that, in one of the region’s most renowned temples, a cat took part in the meditation sessions. The story began to spread.
Many years passed. The cat died, but as the students at the monastery were so used to its presence, they soon found another cat. Meanwhile, the other temples began introducing cats in their meditation sessions: they believed the cat was truly responsible for the fame and excellence of Mayu Kagi’s teaching.

A generation passed, and technical treatises began to appear about the importance of the cat in Zen meditation. A university professor developed a thesis – which was accepted by the academic community – that felines have the ability to increase human concentration, and eliminate negative energy.
And so, for a whole century, the cat was considered an essential part of Zen Buddhist studies in that region.

Until a master appeared who was allergic to animal hair, and decided to remove the cat from his daily exercises with the students.

There was a fierce negative reaction – but the master insisted. Since he was an excellent instructor, the students continued to make the same progress, in spite of the absence of the cat.
Little by little, the monasteries – always in search of new ideas, and already tired of having to feed so many cats – began eliminating the animals from the classes. In twenty years new revolutionary theories began to appear – with very convincing titles such as “The Importance of Meditating Without a Cat”, or “Balancing the Zen Universe by Will Power Alone, Without the Help of Animals”.

Another century passed, and the cat withdrew completely from the meditation rituals in that region. But two hundred years were necessary for everything to return to normal – because during all this time, no one asked why the cat was there.

What’s So Strange About Being Strange?

Some stories from the book Thinking Trees and Laughing Cats (A Thinking Curriculum for Pre-School Education), a book published by the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (IAPC). These stories are meant to be introduction stories for a philosophical discussion with children (and adults, too!). I spent two weeks in New Jersey, USA just inhaling and exhaling the philosophies of Philosophy for Children (how redundant). This is one of the books I really liked. Enjoy 🙂

photo from http://www.sodahead.com

I DO IT THIS WAY

Millie and Susie were playing dress-up together all morning.  Then they started fighting over who would wear the orange hat.

“Time for a nap before lunch I think,” called out Millie’s mom from the kitchen.

“No,” said Susie to Millie, “I have lunch, then I have a sleep.”

“But I sleep and have lunch after,” replied Millie.

“That’s a funny way to do things,” said Susie, “ It’s like putting your shirt and pants on before putting your undershirt and underpants on.”

“What’s wrong with that?” questioned Millie.

A RED SANDAL AND A PINK SNEAKER

One day, Sara put a red sandal on her right foot and a pink sneaker on her left foot.

Sara said to Robin, “I think I look beautiful.  A red sandal really matches a pink sneaker.”

Robin said, “To wear a red sandal with a pink sneaker is not beautiful.  It’s just strange.”

“Why is it strange?” Sara asked.

“Everyone puts the same shoe on the right and left feet.  So, to put a different shoe on each foot is strange.  And a strange thing cannot be beautiful.”  Robin said.

“Then why do you wear a shirt with yellow on the right sleeve and green on the left sleeve?” Sara asked.

 Click this to view the whole book (with exercises)

I Think Therefore I Am…Modern Version

A story from the book Thinking Trees and Laughing Cats (A Thinking Curriculum for Pre-School Education), a book published by the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (IAPC). These stories are meant to be introduction stories for a philosophical discussion with children (and adults, too!). I spent two weeks in New Jersey, USA just inhaling and exhaling the philosophies of Philosophy for Children (how redundant). This is one of the books I really liked. Enjoy 🙂

image from http://www.redmotolov.com

HOW DO YOU KNOW YOU EXIST?

 David said, “I’m scared of monsters.”

Ann said: “Some people like monsters: they aren’t afraid of them.”

“I’m scared of big, ugly monsters.  They make my teeth chatter,” said David.

Emma said, “It’s okay to be scared but I’m not scared of monsters, they’re my favorites.”

Victor said,  “I can be scared, just like an animal.”

“Animals are alive, that’s why they can be scared,” remarked Emma.

“So stones can’t be scared, because stones aren’t alive?” asked David.

Victor said, “Yeah, like statues.  Statues are never scared!”

Ann replied, “I get it! Things that don’t exist can’t be scared.”

David said, “I can be scared, so I must exist.”

Click this to view the whole book (with exercises)

Why Do You Do What You Do?

A story from the book Thinking Trees and Laughing Cats (A Thinking Curriculum for Pre-School Education), a book published by the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (IAPC). These stories are meant to be introduction stories for a philosophical discussion with children (and adults, too!). I spent two weeks in New Jersey, USA just inhaling and exhaling the philosophies of Philosophy for Children (how redundant). This is one of the books I really liked. Enjoy 🙂

photo from http://www.holycow.typepad.net

 WHEN IS IT GOOD TO DO NOTHING AND WHEN IS IT ISN’T?

The teacher said, “Kathy, here are six questions for you to answer.”

Kathy said, “Do I have to answer all six of them?”

The teacher said, “Kathy, pick just one.”

Kathy said, “When you’re swimming it’s not good to do nothing.”

The teacher asked, “Why not?”

Kathy said, “Why do I have to say why?”

The teacher said, “You should always be ready to give a reason for what you do.”

photo from http://www.nerdbase.blogspot.com

 Click this to view the whole book (with exercises)

I Want To Say MY OWN Word

A story from the book Thinking Trees and Laughing Cats (A Thinking Curriculum for Pre-School Education), a book published by the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (IAPC). These stories are meant to be introduction stories for a philosophical discussion with children (and adults, too!). I spent two weeks in New Jersey, USA just inhaling and exhaling the philosophies of Philosophy for Children (how redundant). This is one of the books I really liked. Enjoy 🙂

photo from http://www.google.com


I WANT TO SAY MY OWN WORD

The teacher led her kindergartners to a field.  It was a quiet morning in early autumn. A flock of migrating birds were flying far away in the sky.  The birds were calling softly; that’s why it was a sad day in the field.

 The teacher told her children, “Let’s compose a story about autumn, the sky and the migrating birds we have seen today. Each of you describe the sky. Pay attention now, and think.”

The children became silent.  They looked at the sky and thought.  After a minute the first compositions came:

The sky is blue…

The sky is light blue…

The sky is clear…

The sky is pale blue…

And that was all.  Children were repeating the same words again and again: blue, light blue, clear, pale blue.  A little girl with blue eyes was silently standing aside.  “Why are you silent, Jennifer?” asked the teacher.

“I want to say my own word.”

“Well, what would you say about the sky?”

“The sky is tender,” Jennifer said and smiled softly.  The children became silent.  In this moment they could notice something they had not seen before.

The sky is sad…

The sky is disturbing…

The sky is sorrowful…

The sky is ice cold…

 The sky was playing, trembling, breathing, smiling, just like a live being, and the children were looking into the sad blue eyes of the autumn sky.

Click this to view the whole book (with exercises)