What’s So Strange About Being Strange?

Some stories from the book Thinking Trees and Laughing Cats (A Thinking Curriculum for Pre-School Education), a book published by the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (IAPC). These stories are meant to be introduction stories for a philosophical discussion with children (and adults, too!). I spent two weeks in New Jersey, USA just inhaling and exhaling the philosophies of Philosophy for Children (how redundant). This is one of the books I really liked. Enjoy 🙂

photo from http://www.sodahead.com

I DO IT THIS WAY

Millie and Susie were playing dress-up together all morning.  Then they started fighting over who would wear the orange hat.

“Time for a nap before lunch I think,” called out Millie’s mom from the kitchen.

“No,” said Susie to Millie, “I have lunch, then I have a sleep.”

“But I sleep and have lunch after,” replied Millie.

“That’s a funny way to do things,” said Susie, “ It’s like putting your shirt and pants on before putting your undershirt and underpants on.”

“What’s wrong with that?” questioned Millie.

A RED SANDAL AND A PINK SNEAKER

One day, Sara put a red sandal on her right foot and a pink sneaker on her left foot.

Sara said to Robin, “I think I look beautiful.  A red sandal really matches a pink sneaker.”

Robin said, “To wear a red sandal with a pink sneaker is not beautiful.  It’s just strange.”

“Why is it strange?” Sara asked.

“Everyone puts the same shoe on the right and left feet.  So, to put a different shoe on each foot is strange.  And a strange thing cannot be beautiful.”  Robin said.

“Then why do you wear a shirt with yellow on the right sleeve and green on the left sleeve?” Sara asked.

 Click this to view the whole book (with exercises)

I Think Therefore I Am…Modern Version

A story from the book Thinking Trees and Laughing Cats (A Thinking Curriculum for Pre-School Education), a book published by the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (IAPC). These stories are meant to be introduction stories for a philosophical discussion with children (and adults, too!). I spent two weeks in New Jersey, USA just inhaling and exhaling the philosophies of Philosophy for Children (how redundant). This is one of the books I really liked. Enjoy 🙂

image from http://www.redmotolov.com

HOW DO YOU KNOW YOU EXIST?

 David said, “I’m scared of monsters.”

Ann said: “Some people like monsters: they aren’t afraid of them.”

“I’m scared of big, ugly monsters.  They make my teeth chatter,” said David.

Emma said, “It’s okay to be scared but I’m not scared of monsters, they’re my favorites.”

Victor said,  “I can be scared, just like an animal.”

“Animals are alive, that’s why they can be scared,” remarked Emma.

“So stones can’t be scared, because stones aren’t alive?” asked David.

Victor said, “Yeah, like statues.  Statues are never scared!”

Ann replied, “I get it! Things that don’t exist can’t be scared.”

David said, “I can be scared, so I must exist.”

Click this to view the whole book (with exercises)

Why Do You Do What You Do?

A story from the book Thinking Trees and Laughing Cats (A Thinking Curriculum for Pre-School Education), a book published by the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (IAPC). These stories are meant to be introduction stories for a philosophical discussion with children (and adults, too!). I spent two weeks in New Jersey, USA just inhaling and exhaling the philosophies of Philosophy for Children (how redundant). This is one of the books I really liked. Enjoy 🙂

photo from http://www.holycow.typepad.net

 WHEN IS IT GOOD TO DO NOTHING AND WHEN IS IT ISN’T?

The teacher said, “Kathy, here are six questions for you to answer.”

Kathy said, “Do I have to answer all six of them?”

The teacher said, “Kathy, pick just one.”

Kathy said, “When you’re swimming it’s not good to do nothing.”

The teacher asked, “Why not?”

Kathy said, “Why do I have to say why?”

The teacher said, “You should always be ready to give a reason for what you do.”

photo from http://www.nerdbase.blogspot.com

 Click this to view the whole book (with exercises)

I Want To Say MY OWN Word

A story from the book Thinking Trees and Laughing Cats (A Thinking Curriculum for Pre-School Education), a book published by the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (IAPC). These stories are meant to be introduction stories for a philosophical discussion with children (and adults, too!). I spent two weeks in New Jersey, USA just inhaling and exhaling the philosophies of Philosophy for Children (how redundant). This is one of the books I really liked. Enjoy 🙂

photo from http://www.google.com


I WANT TO SAY MY OWN WORD

The teacher led her kindergartners to a field.  It was a quiet morning in early autumn. A flock of migrating birds were flying far away in the sky.  The birds were calling softly; that’s why it was a sad day in the field.

 The teacher told her children, “Let’s compose a story about autumn, the sky and the migrating birds we have seen today. Each of you describe the sky. Pay attention now, and think.”

The children became silent.  They looked at the sky and thought.  After a minute the first compositions came:

The sky is blue…

The sky is light blue…

The sky is clear…

The sky is pale blue…

And that was all.  Children were repeating the same words again and again: blue, light blue, clear, pale blue.  A little girl with blue eyes was silently standing aside.  “Why are you silent, Jennifer?” asked the teacher.

“I want to say my own word.”

“Well, what would you say about the sky?”

“The sky is tender,” Jennifer said and smiled softly.  The children became silent.  In this moment they could notice something they had not seen before.

The sky is sad…

The sky is disturbing…

The sky is sorrowful…

The sky is ice cold…

 The sky was playing, trembling, breathing, smiling, just like a live being, and the children were looking into the sad blue eyes of the autumn sky.

Click this to view the whole book (with exercises)

My Magic Green Glasses

A story from the book Thinking Trees and Laughing Cats (A Thinking Curriculum for Pre-School Education), a book published by the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (IAPC). These stories are meant to be introduction stories for a philosophical discussion with children (and adults, too!). I spent two weeks in New Jersey, USA just inhaling and exhaling the philosophies of Philosophy for Children (how redundant). This is one of the books I really liked. Enjoy 🙂

photo from http://www.news.thomasnet.com


MY MAGIC GREEN GLASSES

 At breakfast time, Melissa looked through her pockets.

“What are you doing?” Catherine asked Melissa.

Melissa said, “I’m looking for my green magic glasses.  Last night I put them in my pocket.”

“What are green magic glasses?” Catherine asked.

“They are glasses that are for mealtimes.  I don’t like to eat.  So, at mealtimes, instead of eating, if I wear those glasses and just look at foods, I become full.”  Melissa said.

“Wahoo!  Who gave you those glasses?” Catherine asked.

“An old man gave me them in a dream I had about not liking to eat.”  Melissa said.

“Did it happen in your dream?  That’s just a dream.  It’s not real.” Catherine said.

“Isn’t a dream real?  If a dream isn’t real, how can I not like to eat in a dream and really not like to eat at the same time?” Melissa asked.

Click this to view the whole book (with exercises)

What’s Better and Why?

A story from the book Thinking Trees and Laughing Cats (A Thinking Curriculum for Pre-School Education), a book published by the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (IAPC). These stories are meant to be introduction stories for a philosophical discussion with children (and adults, too!). I spent two weeks in New Jersey, USA just inhaling and exhaling the philosophies of Philosophy for Children (how redundant). This is one of the books I really liked. Enjoy 🙂

photo from http://www.desktoppedia.com

WHICH IS BETTER?

There was once a little girl who loved asking questions.  She especially liked to ask “Which is better?” questions.

         She would say to her mother, “Which is better, apples or pears? Water or lemonade? A ball or a doll?”

         Her mother answered patiently, although she did have her doubts.  How can you say whether a ball is better than a doll, or a rose is better than a tulip?

         One day the little girl asked, “Mother, what’s better: fairy tales or songs?”

         Her mother replied, “If you tell me, which is better, the sun or the sky, I’ll tell you which is better, fairy tales or songs.”

         The little girl thought long and hard, but it was no use.  She looked up at the sky and at the bright round sun.  They were each so beautiful and you couldn’t see one without seeing the other.

        After that the little girl no longer asked what’s better.  She had other questions: What’s the best thing about fairy tales? And what’s the best thing about songs?

         And her mother was delighted to answer these new questions.

Click this to view the whole book (with exercises)

Which is Right?

A story from the book Thinking Trees and Laughing Cats (A Thinking Curriculum for Pre-School Education), a book published by the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (IAPC). These stories are meant to be introduction stories for a philosophical discussion with children (and adults, too!). I spent two weeks in New Jersey, USA just inhaling and exhaling the philosophies of Philosophy for Children (how redundant). This is one of the books I really liked. Enjoy 🙂

photo from http://www.dryicons.com

MY HANDS ARE RIGHT

One day Heather and James were measuring the height of the table with their hands.  “It’s seven hands high,” said Heather.

 “No, it’s about six hands high,” said James.

“Well how can something be both six and seven hands high?” asked Heather.

“My hands are bigger than yours, that’s why,” replied James.

“So which is the right height?” Heather asked.

“Mine” said James.

“It’s right for you,” said Heather, “But not for me.”

“One of them has to be right Heather,” James replied.

“Does it?” questioned Heather.

Click this to view the whole book (with exercises)

Travels in the Classroom

A story from the book Thinking Trees and Laughing Cats (A Thinking Curriculum for Pre-School Education), a book published by the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (IAPC). These stories are meant to be introduction stories for a philosophical discussion with children (and adults, too!). I spent two weeks in New Jersey, USA just inhaling and exhaling the philosophies of Philosophy for Children (how redundant). This is one of the books I really liked. Enjoy 🙂

photo from http://www.englishexercises.org

TRAVELS IN THE CLASSROOM

Seth said, “Elfie, which is further – from your chair to the door, or from the door to your chair?”

 “It’s further from the door to my chair,” said Elfie.

 Sophia said, “Are you sure, Elfie?  It seems to me that from my chair to the door and from the door to my chair are the same distance.”

 Seth said, “Do you hear that, Elfie?  Sophia said they’re the same distance!”

 Elfie said, “Sophia wasn’t talking about from my chair to the door and back!  She was talking about from her chair to the door and back!”

 Seth said, “Elfie, it’s the same thing!”

 Elfie said, “It’s not the same thing! When Sophia comes back in, she goes straight to her chair.  But when I come back in, I have to walk around the room and talk on the way to everyone I meet.  So for me, coming back to my chair is a lot longer.”

 Seth said, “I should know better than to argue with you, Elfie.”

Click this to view the whole book (with exercises)

How Do We Choose Our Puppy’s Name?

A story from the book Thinking Trees and Laughing Cats (A Thinking Curriculum for Pre-School Education), a book published by the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (IAPC). These stories are meant to be introduction stories for a philosophical discussion with children (and adults, too!). I spent two weeks in New Jersey, USA just inhaling and exhaling the philosophies of Philosophy for Children (how redundant). This is one of the books I really liked. Enjoy 🙂

photo from http://www.wallpapersland.net

HOW DO WE CHOOSE OUR PUPPY’S NAME?

 “Ron, Sara, I’m home,” Mr. Smith yelled.  There was a small puppy sleeping in Mr. Smith’s arms.

“Wow, so cute!” Ron and Sara shouted at the same time, “Daddy, what’s the puppy’s name?”

There was a family meeting to decide the puppy’s name.

 “Cream!” Sara said. “The puppy is white and soft.”

“I don’t think Cream is a good name.  Cream is a type of food.  It doesn’t suit a puppy.”  Ron answered.

Sara wondered, “Why not?”

“How about Spot Smith?” Sara tried again. “Ron Smith, Sara Smith and Spot Smith.  Our sister!”

“This puppy isn’t part of our family, it’s just our pet.  I don’t think our puppy can be our sister.”  Ron answered.

Sara wondered again, “Why not?”

Click this to view the whole book (with exercises)

What is a Friend?

Some stories from the book Thinking Trees and Laughing Cats (A Thinking Curriculum for Pre-School Education), a book published by the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (IAPC). These stories are meant to be introduction stories for a philosophical discussion with children (and adults, too!). I spent two weeks in New Jersey, USA just inhaling and exhaling the philosophies of Philosophy for Children (how redundant). This is one of the books I really liked. Enjoy 🙂

photo from http://www.gucicanz.info

STORY: PICTURE OF A FRIEND

One day, the teacher asked the children to draw pictures of their friends.  The next day they were showing their pictures to the class.  There were picture of boys and girls from the class.  Some pictures were really nice.

Now it was Elfie’s turn to show her picture.  Her picture was different from the others.  It was a picture of a pine-tree.  Some kids started laughing.  Elfie said, “My father planted this pine-tree near our house when I was born.  We are growing together.  And we are good friends.”

 Everyone was silent.  The children were looking at the picture and thinking.

photo from http://www.fwd2all.com

STORY: THE FROG IS MY FRIEND

One day, Robin showed Sara a small green frog in his hand.  Robin said to Sara, “This frog is my friend.”

 Sara asked, “Why is this frog your friend?”

 Robin thought a bit, then said, “Well, I played with this frog today.  We hopped on the rock together.  I think if we play together, we are friends—aren’t we?”

 “I’m not sure,” Sara answered.  “I played with a ball today.  Does that mean the ball is my friend?”

 Robin laughed and said, “How could a ball be your friend?  Balls aren’t alive!”

Sara said, “Do you think only living things can be friends?”

 This made Robin stop and think.  And after he thought, he said, “Yes, I think so.  A thing can’t be your friend if it isn’t alive.  Can it?”

 Sara didn’t answer right away.  She looked down at the small green frog.  She petted it gently.

 “Well?” Robin said.  Sara looked up at him.  “I was just thinking about my doll, Harper,” she said.

Click this to view the whole book (with exercises)